Project Description

A global innovation when launched almost a decade ago, these 25 euro silver niobium coins still combine state-of-the-art numismatic technology and first-rate aesthetic design. First issued in 2003, their silver outer ring and coloured niobium ‘pill’, which is attained by oxidation as opposed to the application of artificial colour, have provided the perfect backdrop for exploringCSP-AUSTRIA-NIOBIUM-BOX suitably technological themes, from astronomy to aviation, robotics to renewable energy and electric light to television.

Although as common as lead and even present in the human body, niobium was only discovered at the beginning of the 19th century. A resistant metal with extremely high chemical stability, it can be rolled and forged at room temperature, which in part explains why niobium is increasingly popular as a component in the manufacture of jewellery. Another of niobium’s facets is that colour does not need to be applied to it. Instead, through ‘anodized oxidation’, the method first applied to coins by the Austrian Mint, a thin oxide layer is produced on the coin surface and subsequent light refraction enables different colours to arise. The resultant effect is quite striking and quite unique.

Equally striking is the quality of artwork on both sides of these coins. The 2012 coin Bionik, has been nominated for an award at the 2014 Coin of the Year awards, the 2011 coin, Robotik, won Best Contemporary Event and the 2008 coin, Fascination Light, won Most Innovative Coin.

We know that many collectors don’t bother looking at Euro coins, but there are some terrific quality series coming from the European mints and the quality is usually top-notch. The Silver Niobium series definitely fit’s that description and is well worth a good look. They come packaged in the Austrian Mint’s usual little red box, which are small, neat and appreciated by those with collections that can do without huge boxes.

Mintages have settled at 65,000 and they all seem to sell out. An attractive, unusual collection that’s reasonably priced. We’d like to see the process applied to a coin series with more worldwide appeal as well.

UPDATE 06/11/2013: 2014 EVOLUTION ADDED

2003 700 YEARS OF HALL IN TYROL
2003-700-YEARS-OF-HALL-IN-TYROL

The coin commemorates the charter granted over 700 years ago to the town of Hall in the Tyrol, where the first large silver coin, the Guldiner, was struck in 1486. The die used to make the Guldiner features in the blue niobium core of the coin’s reverse, a reference to Hall’s historical role in the minting business as well as the metal that forms the outer ring of all the coins in the Silver Niobium series. A relatively new find only discovered in 1801, niobium plays an important role in the space industry, something acknowledged on the coin’s reverse, where a satellite maps the town of Hall from space.

With a maximum mintage of 50,000 pieces in Special Uncirculated quality only, the coin contains 9 grammes of 900 Fine silver in its outer ring and 6.5 grammes of 998 pure niobium. Each coin is encapsulated, boxed and comes complete with a numbered certificate guaranteeing its authenticity.

quality: special uncirculated
collection: Silver-Niobium
face value: 25 Euro
date of issue: 29.01.2003
coin design: Mag. Helmut Andexlinger / Herbert Wähner/
diameter: 34.00 mm
alloy: Silver-Niobium
ring: Silver Ag 900
pill: Niobium Nb 99,8
fine weight: 9.00 g
total weight: 17.15 g

2004 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF SAMMERING RAILWAY
2005 50 YEARS OF TELEVISION
2006 SATELLITE NAVIGATION
2007 AUSTRIAN AVIATION
2008 FASCINATION LIGHT
2009 INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF ASTRONOMY
2010 RENEWABLE ENERGY
2011 ROBOTIK
2012 BIONIK
2013 TUNNEL CONSTRUCTION
2014 EVOLUTION

AUSTRIAN MINT NIOBIUM COLLECTION