Queens Beasts Lion coin now available in a full range of gold and silver proof sizes

The Royal Mint surprised us all earlier this year when it debuted a quite beautiful new bullion coin series called The Queens Beasts. To be released two per year, the coins were available in 2oz silver and ¼oz and 1oz gold. Designed by one of the most talented coin artists working in modern numismatics, Jody Clark, it literally dripped with Britishness and the second coin that debuted recently and featured the Griffin, is equally impressive. Like me, you all seemed to have expressed a desire for a proof version. Wait no longer.

Available in a whole multitude of sizes, the silver starts at one ounce and passes through five ounces, ten ounces (a Royal Mint first), and through to a kilo. Ironically, the original two-ounce size isn’t replicated in proof form. For gold the range comprises a quarter ounce, one ounce, five ounce and a kilo. In line with usual Royal Mint pricing, the bigger sizes are expensive, but mintages are relatively tight, especially at the very chunky end.

It’s an absolutely beautiful piece of work in our view, with a definition that was lacking in the bullion version, and the mirrored background bringing the main design into sharper relief. Packaging as always with the Royal Mint is excellent and all come with a Certificate of Authenticity and the Jody Clark effigy of Her Maj on the back.

Disappointments outside of the price are few. The ten ounce coin should have replicated the diameter of the kilo coin instead of the five ounce. I can’t say a piedfort version of a coin that large and expensive is a particularly good choice, but a more affordable version of the kilo would’ve been more welcome. As for the prices, the silver coins come in at £85.00, £415.00, £795.00 and £2050.00 for the kilo. Gold coins are £455.00, £1795.00, £8250.00 and the kilo at, wait for it, £49,995.00. Available to buy now, and we reckon the five-ounce will again be the one that shows off the design the best.

2017 QUEENS BEASTS LION PROOF COIN RANGE

SPECIFICATION

DENOMINATION COMPOSITION WEIGHT DIAMETER FINISH SOLO MINTAGE MAX MINTAGE
$2 UKP 0.9999 SILVER 32.21 g 38.61 mm PROOF 8,500 8,500
$10 UKP 0.9999 SILVER 156.295 g 65.0 mm PROOF 1,500 2,500
$10 UKP 0.9999 SILVER 313.00 g 65.0 mm PROOF 750 1,250
$500 UKP 0.9999 SILVER 1005.0 g 100.00 mm PROOF 350 600
$25 UKP 0.9999 GOLD 7.8 g 22.00 mm PROOF 2,500 2,500
$100 UKP 0.9999 GOLD 31.21 g 32.69 mm PROOF 750 1,000
$500 UKP 0.9999 GOLD 156.295 g 50.0 mm PROOF 100 125
$1000 UKP 0.9999 GOLD 1005.0 g 100.0 mm PROOF 20 20 (tbc)

MINTS DESCRIPTION

Inspired by the mythical and medieval, The Queen’s Beasts Collection from The Royal Mint represents centuries of British royal heraldry. Royal Mint coin designer Jody Clark created the current coinage portrait of Her Majesty The Queen, the world’s longest reigning living monarch. He has now brought the beasts to life in a series of contemporary coin designs and the Lion of England leads the pack.

The Queen’s Beasts Collection brings centuries of royal heritage and tradition firmly into the twenty-first century. The origins of heraldry can be traced back to the middle of the twelfth century, when knights painted their shields and the coats they wore over their armour to recognise ‘friend or foe’ on the battlefield. These emblems have survived hundreds of years, being passed down through generations, and still appear on everyday items like British passports.

Some of the most famous heraldic symbols are The Queen’s Beasts. At the coronation of Her Majesty The Queen in 1953, ten statues symbolically guarded the entrance to Westminster Abbey. They were carved by sculptor James Woodford RA, each one standing six-feet high. More than 60 years later, Royal Mint coin designer Jody Clark has created a series of ten contemporary designs capturing these proud creatures.

The Collection begins with the Lion of England, one of the earliest animals to appear in royal emblems. Jody’s lion is inspired by the original coronation statues, retaining a sense of sculpture, but with a dynamic feel to convey the power of the ‘King of the Beasts’.

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ROYAL MINT
By |2016-12-05T16:01:03+00:00December 5th, 2016|Categories: Culture, History, Gold, Silver, Royal Mint, United Kingdom|2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Ken December 5, 2016 at 15:23 - Reply

    Same case like in the past. On their homepage they mentioned two different numbers (Limited Edition Presentation and Maximum Coin Mintage). For example 10oz silver version has numbers 750 and 1250.

    • Mik Woodgate
      Mik Woodgate December 5, 2016 at 15:52 - Reply

      It is annoying I know. I’ve updated the specification chart above to clarify. I’d normally have done it but the Royal Mint gives almost no notice to any media before releasing and there’s still no proper press release for it.

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