Most well-known for the Mongolian Endangered Species nature coins and the Tiffany art-architectural series, Coin-Invest Trust also release some odd and unusual lower-profile coins. They’re one of the few that have actively embraced the gold half-gram size, designing coins specifically for the format, and also releasing themed series containing dozens of releases.

They’re not afraid to try something new, and while they sometimes fall flat, the hits when they come, are significant. There’s a sprinkling of everything in the last batch of coins they released to coincide with the Chicago ANA show, and we’ve already covered the Fahrenheit thermometer coin and the latest meteorite coin, Moldavite, elsewhere. Contained here are the rest, including their first lenticular coin, this one commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall. We’ve divided them up into two posts for easier reading. Next one soon.

MARINE LIFE PROTECTION: BOXFISH

 

2014-CIT-BOXFISH

 

This is one of those series that we know exists, but admit to knowing too little about and had never realised had been going so long. The series debuted in 1992 and while it’s down to a single release per year, it’s still going strong. They’re a simple enough specification, like a few of Coin-Invest Trusts other long-running series, being 25g of sterling silver with reverse-side colouring, but they’re nearly always well done and that’s the case here. The little half-gram gold versions are nice as well, exhibiting fine detail for their 11mm diameter.

The interesting and unusual thing about this series that helps it stand out, are the obverse side changes. The national emblem of Palau lends itself well to some dynamic reinterpretation, and CIT have certainly taken full advantage of that with some great designs. Essentially it’s a trident-wielding Poseidon and/or mermaids in a style best described as Butts, Boobs and Biceps. Works for me…

MINT DESCRIPTION: The reefs surrounding Palau are home to an astonishing variety of marine species. In order to protect its natural underwater heritage, Palau was the first country to establish a shark sanctuary. The ban on shark fishing also benefited smaller reef inhabitants such as the vibrant Yellow Boxfish shown on the 2014 Marine Life Protection coins. A deep blue giant clam, colorful Christmas tree worms, and scarlet cleaner shrimps complete the miniature reef ecosystem portrayed on the coins.

SPECIFICATION:

FACE VALUE METAL WEIGHT DIAMETER QUALITY MINTAGE
$5 PALAU 0.925 AG 25.0 g 38.61 mm PROOF 1,500
$1 PALAU 0.9999 AU 0.5 g 11.00 mm PROOF 10,000

 

FALL OF THE BERLIN WALL

 

Twenty five years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and there have been few numismatic commemoratives marking this hugely important event. The Austrian Mint did a nice coin a few months ago and now CIT have something a little different to add to the mix. Touting what they call in the sadly spreading language of marketingese, 3D-Laser Tilt technology, it’s effectively a two stage lenticular-style process. Basically, when a coin with this type of imagery on it is tilted to one side or another, it changes completely.

For this coin, a tilt to one side reveals a portrait image of West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, and tilting it to the other side reveals Mikhail Gorbachev. It looks well done, but we’ll reserve final judgement until we’ve seen one.

MINT DESCRIPTION: The Berlin Wall divided the city into East and West and was regarded as the most distinctive symbol of the separation.
The former Federal Chancellor of the Republic of Germany, Helmut Kohl and the Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev initiated the end of the Cold War. As a result of the wall falling on November 9th, 1989, Germany was reunited.

SPECIFICATION:

FACE VALUE METAL WEIGHT DIAMETER QUALITY MINTAGE
$5 PALAU 0.999 AG 25.0 g 38.61 mm PROOF 2,014

 

FERNAO DO PO

 

Another of the tiny half-gram gold coins that are a constant presence in CIT’s range, this one celebrates Portuguese explorer Fernao do Po (no relation to Kung Fu Panda).

Discovering some islands in the Gulf of Guinea around 1472, one of which bore the (rather unfortunate) name Fernando Poo until the 1900’s, he was credited with being the first European explorer to discover the SW coast of Africa. The island was renamed Bioko and it’s part of Equatorial Guinea, for whom this coin is issued.

SPECIFICATION:

FACE VALUE METAL WEIGHT DIAMETER QUALITY MINTAGE
1000 Francos CFA 0.9999 Au 0.5 g 11.00 mm PROOF 15,000

 

2015 OUNCE OF LUCK

2015-CIT-OUNCE-OF-LUCK

Clover belongs to the plant family called legumes (Fabaceae). Their generic botanical name Trifolium is derived from the three leaves, which a clover normally has.

As a freak of nature, the number of its leaves can vary in rare cases. Clover with one, six and even seven leaves have already been found. The most well known variety is definitely the four-leaf clover. Even during the time of the Celts this clover was considered as a protective symbol. It represents the four cardinalpoints and the four elements: water, fire, air and earth. In Christianity it symbolizes the cross. The rare appearance and the difficulty of finding a four-leaf clover make this plant a lucky symbol in many cultures.

According to prevalent faith it also banishes evil, protects one from misfortune and brings good luck in gambling. A four-leaf clover in a schoolbook, supposedly also helps one attain higher grades and one under a pillow brings sweet dreams. Even if it does not work, there is certainly no harm done keeping a clover, inlaid in a classic silver coin, close by. Is there a more beautiful gift than luck?

This one is essentially the same coin as that released last year except for some small design differences in the border, hence the text above is pretty much identical as well. For all its familiarity, it’s a pretty coin and one that given as a gift, will have meaning, so we can’t knock it for that.

SPECIFICATION:

FACE VALUE METAL WEIGHT DIAMETER QUALITY MINTAGE
$5 PALAU 0.925 Ag 31.1 g 38.61 mm PROOF 2,015