AUREUS: ANCIENT ROMAN GOLD FEATURES ON MODERN SILVER COINS

2014-AUREUS-feat

For all the Computer Aided Design, laser-etching, complex finishes and intricate shapes used on modern coins, there’s no finer coin to hold in your hand than something steeped in the history of the greatest empire of the ancient world, Rome. Of those coins the Aureus is amongst the most sought after, both for its relatively large size and for its scarcity, especially prior to the reign of Julius Caesar.

The Aureus was valued at 25 silver denarii and was about the same diameter, but heavier due to the differing densities of gold and silver. Julius Caesar standardised the weight at 1/40th of a Roman pound (8.18g), but as with anything in the financial world, they gradually got smaller and smaller until by the time of the Emperor Constantine, they were replaced by the Solidus, a coin weighing only 4.55 grams. However, regardless of the size or weight of the aureus, the coin’s purity was little affected. Analysis of the Roman aureus shows the purity level usually to have been near to 24 carat gold in excess of 99%.

Because the Roman government issued base-metal coinage but refused to take anything but gold or silver coinage in payment for taxes, inflation was rampant, Along with the debasement of the silver denarius which by the mid 3rd century AD was virtually devoid of actual silver, the aureus became worth more and more relatively speaking. In 301, one gold aureus was worth 833⅓ denarii; by 324, the same aureus was worth 4,350 denarii. In 337, after Constantine converted to the solidus, one solidus was worth 275,000 denarii and finally, by 356, one solidus was worth 4,600,000 denarii. Echos of todays farcical fiat systems perhaps…

Anyway, the three coins just released by Swiss-based producer International Coin House take some of the beautiful designs that adorned the ancient Roman coins and incorporated them into some excellent artwork of their own. Featuring the bull symbol of Octavians legions, Venus the Roman goddess of love, and Iustitia the Roman goddess of Justice, the three 1/2oz pure silver coins take a gold printed facsimile of both sides of a Roman aureus and overlay them onto a fine silver coin, each depicting contemporary interpretations of the original subjects. International Coin House aren’t the most high-profile of coin producers, but hopefully one look at these will tell you they’re a worthy one, as these are definitely a step up from their previous releases on both design and subject appeal. Available shortly.

AUREUS TAURUS

REVERSE: At the bottom a replica of a coin from ancient Rome, minted in the Octavian August period. On the obverse of the ancient coin a profile of Octavian August, on the reverse of the ancient coin a charging bull – a symbol of victorious Octavian’s legions. On the top of the coin a bull as a symbol of a bull market. On the background the elements connected with stock exchange. Inscription (a Latin phrase): “Crede quod habes, et habes” (“Believe that you have it, and you do”).

OBVERSE: Common to all three coins as you’d expect. In the centre, an effigy of the Queen Elizabeth II that is similar to the Ralph Maklouf portrait. Around the coin are the inscriptions: “ELIZABETH II”, “NIUE”, “ONE DOLLAR”, “15,5g” (weight of the coin), “2014”and the hallmark “Ag999,9”.

AUREUS VENUS

2014 AUREUS VENUS REV

REVERSE: At the bottom, a replica of a gold coin from ancient Rome. On the obverse of the ancient coin a profile of Faustina the Younger (Annia Galeria Faustina Minor) ( 122 – 175) a daughter of the emperor Antoninus Pius, wife of the emperor Marc Antony (Marcus Aurelius Antoninus). On the reverse an ancient depiction of Venus goddess holding an apple (a gift from Paris (also known as Alexander) to the most beauty) and a helm. On the top of the coin is a modern depiction of the goddess Venus and the inscription: “Amor vincit omnia” (“Love conquers all things”).

AUREUS IUSTITIA

2014 AUREUS IUSTITIA REV

REVERSE: On the right hand side of the coin reverse there are the replicas of the Aureus – a gold coin from the ancient Rome, minted during emperor Vespasian (lat. Vespasianus) period (69 – 79). On the obverse of the ancient coin a profile of the emperor Vespasian, on the reverse of the ancient coin the sitting goddess of justice, with scepter and patera. On the left side of the coin a modern personification of blindfolded justice with a sword and a balance. Inscription (a Latin phrase): “Ubi civitas ibi ius” (“Where the state there the law”).

SPECIFICATION
DENOMINATION $1 NEW ZEALAND
COMPOSITION 0.9999 SILVER
WEIGHT 15.5 g
DIAMETER 35.0 mm
FINISH PROOF / SELECTIVE GOLD PRINTING
MINTAGE 3,333
REVERSE ARTIST UNKNOWN IN-HOUSE
OBVERSE ARTIST UNKNOWN IN-HOUSE
PACKAGING YES (BOX OPTIONAL)
C.O.A. YES (NOT SERIALISED)

INTERNATIONAL COIN HOUSE
By | 2016-11-05T06:33:19+00:00 June 23rd, 2014|Categories: Gilded, History, Silver, International Coin House, Niue Island|7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Koichi Ito June 24, 2014 at 08:44 - Reply

    Which country these coins are legal tender? Did Polish Mint made these coins?

  2. Mr Louis Golino June 24, 2014 at 16:20 - Reply

    Any suggestions on where to buy these? The designs are gorgeous.

  3. spica June 24, 2014 at 21:58 - Reply

    Price of each coin is 31,51 EUR without VAT (+ – 20 %).
    You can order via intercoinhouse website 😉

    • Mik Woodgate
      Mik Woodgate June 24, 2014 at 22:05 - Reply

      I understood that was bulk wholesale prices. Are you sure an individual can order single pieces?

      • spica June 24, 2014 at 23:41 - Reply

        I am private collector and I already ordered single coins with intercoinhouse

        • Mik Woodgate
          Mik Woodgate June 25, 2014 at 03:21 - Reply

          Excellent. Thanks for the information.

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